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Accidental Art

9 February 04 words: Irja Uusitalo
This is art for Habitat-people real art for stylish interiors, at a reasonable price. It is no surprise that within 15 minutes two had already sold.

Accidental Art - Wayne Harker Gill


"Vision". That is how one visitor described the exhibition of a trio of textile artists.

Little she knows that these large, powerful paintings and prints are in fact an almost accidental product.

 

The hot summer 2003 inspired Nottingham-born Wayne Harker-Gill to take a break from his sales career and to find his artistic self again by grabbing a paint brush. 

 

He ended up spending the season painting from his hearts contents with his textile-artist wife Claire Vear and William Broome, a fashion artist. The refreshing team-work approach in the often individualistic world of art was not pre-meditated.

 

Wayne Harker Gill - Aciidental Art


Mr Harker-Gill said: "I showed William what I had done and he said he was not too sure about some of it, so I asked what would you do then?  He showed me and it all went from there."


The result is a bold, vibrant and contemporary collection, oozing of summer feel-good.

 

One factor that makes them very saleable is the purposefully affordable price. The pieces exhibited ranged from £150 to £350. This is art for Habitat-people real art for stylish interiors, at a reasonable price. It is no surprise that within 15 minutes of the gallery-opening two had already sold.

 

It sounds almost incredulous when Mr Harker-Gill says candidly: "We never intended to do all this.  We had no intention of selling."


Accidental Art - Wayne Harker Gill


The exhibition is at the Waterstones Gallery  on the top floor of Waterstone's bookshop,

Bridlesmith Gate, NG1 and runs until 26 February.

The textile background of the artists is palpable in the media used, and in the way these images would compliment an interior and provide a focal point.

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