TRCH Priscilla

Mique at the Nottingham Playhouse

12 June 11 words: Françoise Bonner
Singing from a young age with her Grandmother in church, Mique brings old school soul and modern R’n’B through her compositions

Mique

In the last of Cultural Vibrations part of NEAT 11, Nottingham born and bred Mique arrived on stage after a slight delay, apologising and flashing a genuine ‘thank you for being here’ smile.

Singing from a young age with her Grandmother in church, Mique brings old school soul and modern R’n’B through her compositions. A splendidly soulful voice with a fantastic range, she belongs in every era of music.

Mique performed flawlessly throughout her 60 minute set, the longest she’s done in public. Accompanied only by a guitarist (Kieran) enabled Mique to really take centre stage and the audience to enjoy the full effect of her powerful yet tender voice. There was a shy confidence about the way she performed, obvious talent but openly happy to be singing for the crowd.

The set consisted of a mixture of original music and covers, Cry and Please Stay standing out from her original set. Both sang with understated emotion and passion, Mique by this point completely comfortable and visibly enjoying sharing her songs.

The penultimate song of the night was a cover of Angel of the Morning, a song recorded by various artists, with The Pretenders version probably being the most well known. A stillness filled the room as Mique sang, capturing the beauty and innocence of the lyrics.

Mique constantly kept the audience involved. In between songs she commented on what was happening on stage as Kieran swapped guitars as well as explaining why she had chosen certain songs and where her inspiration for her own lyrics had come from.

A cover of Gershwin’s original Summertime ended the evening, bringing Kieran in for some support on vocals; it was a perfect way to finish the set. Showcasing the full range of her voice, Mique sent goose bumps down spines with this sexy jazz piece.

The set flew by and as it ended the audience, except for their applause, didn’t move for few minutes afterwards almost hoping for another song. Summetime had been a fitting ending and as people left the theatre you could hear the tune being whistled into the night.