TRCH Mindgames

Dawn of the Unread

25 March 13 words: James Walker
Calm down, it's only an apocalypse. Illustrators required for graphic novel serial for mobile phone

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"Get them Zombies out of here, Butler"

The Public Libraries & Museums Act 1964 is the law that makes libraries a statutory service. Yet despite this, various libraries up and down the country are being closed down as part of government cuts. It’s not a particularly good time for independent book shops either, with 7% closing down last year alone. Our closest offering is the Bookcase in Lowdham, run by Jane Streeter.   

Although our libraries have not been as hard hit as other areas in the country, cuts have meant that less stock is being brought in which deprives authors of royalties (one Happy Meal per year) and the public loses out on access to ideas. Now books are most visible in the aisles of the supermarket, meaning our reading options are reduced to fifty shades of celeb biogs.

Dawn of the Unread is an attempt to address these issues by imagining what would happen if the great literary figures from Nottingham’s past went unread. If their ideas are not preserved and made accessible then they will effectively disappear from our minds forever. Sillitoe, Lawrence and Byron would never put up with such an insult and so return from the grave in search of the one thing that will ensure their survival…’booooooooooooks’.

Dawn of the Unread is in the very early stages of development and will be released as a graphic novel across media platforms as a mini-serial. Each episode will explore one iconic figure from Nottingham’s incredible literary past. And this is where you lot come in. I’m potentially looking for a different artist to illustrate each episode so I need you to send me an example of your work, CV or relevant links. Commissioned artists will be asked to turn one of the following figures into a zombie: Lord Byron, Arthur Seaton, Alan Sillitoe, D H Lawrence, Graham Greene, Billy Merson, J M Barrie (Peter Pan), Charles Dickens, Brian Clough, Sydney Race, Watson Fothergill, P J Bailey, William Booth and last but not least, Blakey from On the Buses. What connection does Blakey have with Nottingham and literature? None, I just love him. One of the benefits of being a poorly-paid pen monkey is your imagination is not as restrictive as your finances. 

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