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Rebecca Constable On Writing For a Dyslexic Audience

2 March 22 interview: Lizzy O'Riordan

In 2016 Rebecca Constable won a Young Creative Award for her story about dyslexia. She then went on to publish a full length book on Dyslexia friendly paper. We chat to the young creative about writing with dyslexia, her latest creative projects, and The Young Creative Awards...

You entered the Young Creative Awards with Impact – a story about dyslexia…

Impact is a short story based on my own and other people’s experience with Dyslexia. I chose to write about this topic in the hopes of giving teachers, students and parents a small insight into how dyslexia can impact someone’s life. 

The story takes place in a school setting, but we don’t know if the character is six and in primary school or sixteen and in high school, or maybe both, there’s no timeline. I chose to do this because dyslexia has no age and you don’t ‘just grow out of it’ like some people may think.

The short story then became a book, published by Dayglo Books…

Shortly after winning the Young Creative Awards, I was invited to perform a reading of Impact at Bromley House Library, where I then received an offer from Dayglo Books to turn this story into a published book. Dayglo Books publish using tinted paper in multiple colours, larger spacing between paragraphs, and a front face called ‘open dyslexia which can make it easier for some people with Dyslexia to read. 

I loved the experience of not only writing and performing my story but also designing the artwork for the book!

Dayglo Books publish using tinted paper in multiple colours, larger spacing between paragraphs, and a front face called ‘open dyslexia’

You found yourself as a voice for dyslexia. What’s the message you're hoping to spread?

Since writing Impact, I have been asked to speak at multiple dyslexia support groups, for people of all ages. It has been an amazing experience where I have found so many people who have related to Impact. I want people who do not have dyslexia to understand what it means and the impact which their comments can have. I also want people with dyslexic to realise they are not alone. 

You also have a passion for theatre design and model making. What have you been working on lately?

Currently I am working as a set and costume designer for Sheffield Theatre, on the Launchpad project. It is a project for adults with autism and learning disabilities to devise (write/create their own story) and perform their own show in the Crucible Studio Theatre in April 2022. I am also working with a Children’s Theatre Company called Tell Tale Hearts as a set and costume designer and maker on a new show which will be touring in June 2022! 

I have been asked to speak at multiple dyslexia support groups, for people of all ages. It has been an amazing experience where I have found so many people who have related to Impact.

What inspires you to create?

I love storytelling, whether that is through written word or design. I have the chance to meet and work with some amazing people, sharing my own work and seeing other people’s. 

Any future projects we should be looking out for?

In the future I hope to keep creating theatre, particularly children’s theatre and community theatre, giving everyone a chance to get involved. Along with writing and hopefully publishing some more stories. 

And finally, the Young Creative Awards 2022 are now open. What would you say to anyone considering entering?

I would tell anyone thinking of entering to experiment with your art and just have fun!

Learn more about Impact here

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